Fleeting Sounds

This entry was posted in Audio, Digital Preservation, Digitization, Ephemera, Newly Online, Southern History. Bookmark the permalink.

Usually when we think of ephemera — items that were originally meant to be discarded after use but have since become collectibles [source] — we think of documents. Paper is the medium of choice for these transitory items, from ticket stubs and playbills to flyers and menus to… phonograph records?

Recently, our audio guru Corinne digitized three “cardboard” records. These are playable but not particularly long lasting records made of paste paper coated in a thin layer or vinyl or acetate. Such records often served as promotional items or, in the case of the Recordio specimens in our collection, audio recordings created by the average person in a public booth.

These particular records captured the voices of two African-American children as they were shopping in 1946. Click on the record sleeves below to go to the items in Acumen.

Rozmon Kennon (10 years old)
recording of the voice of Rozmon Kennon, 1946, Birmingham, Alabama

Dannetta Kennon (8 years old)
recording of the voice of Dannetta Kennon, 1946, Birmingham, Alabama

Not only were these fascinating to listen to, but digitizing them was vital — we needed to more permanently capture these voices before the fragile medium they were recorded on broke down. There was no special equipment required, just an abundance of caution!

For more on various odd record types, including the Recordio, check out this website devoted to the subject: The Internet Museum of Flexi/Cardboard/Oddity Records.

This entry was posted in Audio, Digital Preservation, Digitization, Ephemera, Newly Online, Southern History. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Fleeting Sounds

  1. Zonnepanelen says:

    Thank you for the publication on various odd record types.

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