Category Archives: Foreign Language

Lasting Impressions

What do pamphlets from the late 18th c. French Revolution and fliers in support of a radical professor in the 1960s and 70s have in common? They were printed and handed out by people supporting radical causes, and they are … Continue reading

Native American Heritage Month

Did you know November is Native American Heritage Month? The W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library houses some really interesting collections pertaining to the Choctaw Indians living in Mississippi and Louisiana at the turn of the twentieth century. The Choctaw … Continue reading

New and Notable in Acumen, Fall ’14 – Spring ’15

A lot has come through the digitization pipeline in the last six months or so. Here are some highlights. Diaries Martha Jane Coleman Banks commonplace book Contains diary entries, miscellaneous writings (some appear to be school related), newspaper clippings, recipes, and … Continue reading

Newly Online: Elbert Nixdorf Letters

We have recently placed a small but interesting collection online, the Elbert Nixdorf Letters. Mr. Nixdorf served in the U. S. Army Special Services during World War II. This collection of letters contains correspondence with friends he made while overseas … Continue reading

The Lost(?) Art of the Telegram

Our search tool, Acumen, is good for turning up items related to a given person or topic, but it can also be used to uncover particular types of items. While diaries and letters are popular tools for research, there are … Continue reading

The World of Camp Aliceville

Like hundreds of other communities in the U.S. during WWII, Aliceville, Alabama, was home to a prisoner of war camp. Between June 1943 and September 1945, Camp Aliceville saw hundreds of thousands of German soldiers come and go, a time which left an … Continue reading

Wish You Were Here: A Century of Postcards

It’s summer, and you know what that means: prime vacation time. Our ways of traveling have changed in the last century or so, along with our means of communicating with our loved ones back home, but one thing has never … Continue reading