Upcoming Events

The ADHC in September is sponsoring the following events:

  • Workshop: Adobe Photoshop
    • Presentor: Lindley Shedd
    • Location: ADHC
    • Topics for the ADHC Photoshop Workshop include working with multiple documents and navigating the program, understanding file types and resolution, working with layers, cropping and transformations, selection tools and how to use them most effectively, working with type, layer effects, adjustment layers and saving and exporting different file types. The demo portion of this workshop will last less than an hour, leaving time for participants to work with the program in a set of provided sample files. Registration Required, limited to 12, contact Tom Wilson (tcwilson@ua.edu) to register.
  • Speaker: Seth Kotch
    • Location: TBA
    • Dr. Kotch is a historian of the American South who specializes in crime and punishment. He has worked for the Southern Oral History Program since arriving at the University of North Carolina in 2003. He worked on the Oral Histories of the American South project, a digitization effort in partnership with Documenting the American South, and currently works on the Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement project with a number of partners around the university. He led planning for the SOHP’s Spring 2009 conference, The Long Civil Rights Movement: Histories, Politics, Memories, and serves as PI on the Civil Rights History Project, funded by the Smithsonian, and Media and the Movement, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This talk is sponsored by the Summersell Center for the Study of the South and the University of Alabama Libraries’ Alabama Digital Humanities Center.

Creating and Managing Your Online Presence

Melissa Fortson Green (Gorgas Information Services) and Franky Abbott (ADHC) presented their “Creating and Managing Your Online Presence” today in the ADHC. Here  is video of the workshop, their handout, and resources for more information (below).

Resources

Further Reading

Tools

Blogs/websites
These free tools make it easy to create and maintain blogs and websites with no HTML experience required. More advanced users or those seeking additional features might consider Drupal (http://drupal.org/), Joomla (http://www.joomla.org/), or WordPress.org (http://wordpress.org/).

  • Blogger: http://www.blogger.com
  • Google Sites: https://sites.google.com/
  • Tumblr: http://www.tumblr.com
  • Weebly: http://www.weebly.com/
  • Wix: http://www.wix.com/
    Wix will be the focus of the next Lunchtime Learning workshop, to be held Wednesday, April 10, 12pm – 1pm, in the Alabama Digital Humanities Center (Gorgas Library Room 109A).
  • WordPress: http://wordpress.com/
  • BrandYourself: http://brandyourself.com/
    The BrandYourself service helps you “control Google search results for your name,” submit and “boost” positive links, monitor changes, and see which companies have viewed your profile.

Document-sharing sites
Document sharing sites rank highly in search results. Consider using Scribd (http://www.scribd.com/) to embed a resume on your blog or website and using SlideShare (http://www.slideshare.net/) to share your presentations.

Facebook

  • Activity Log
    http://www.facebook.com/help/activitylog
    Your activity log is a list of your Facebook posts and activity, along with stories and photos you’ve been tagged in. Dropdown menus next to each story allow you to adjust the privacy and control its visibility on your timeline.
  • Privacy
    http://www.facebook.com/help/privacy
    Information to help you control your sharing on Facebook.
  • A Guide to Facebook Privacy Options (WSJ)
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324880504578300312528424302.html#project%3DFBPRIVACY0308%26articleTabs%3Dinteractive
    Facebook privacy options change frequently, but here’s a recent guide from the Wall Street Journal.

Google

  • Dashboard
    https://www.google.com/dashboard/
    When signed in to your Google account, you can use the Dashboard to view and manage your personal information stored in various Google services.
  • “Me on the Web”
    https://www.google.com/settings/me
    When signed in to your Google account, you can search for yourself, have Google notify you when information abut you appears online, and review your Google profile, all from this page.
  • Profile
    http://profiles.google.com/
    Creating a Google profile is one of the easiest ways to create a distinct online identity for yourself.

LinkedIn

  • LinkedIn
    http://www.linkedin.com/
    LinkedIn is a networking site for professionals. LinkedIn profiles are easy to complete and rank highly in search results.

People search
People search services (also known as peoplefinder sites), allow users to see lots of information about you, including your online profiles and photos. Consider using these tools to see what information about you is freely available online. UnlistMy.Info (http://unlistmy.info/) lists additional people search sites and offers directions on how to remove yourself from their results.

Personal homepages
These personal homepage sites (also known as microsites or splash pages) allow users to easily present bios, contact information, and links to social media channels.

SimpleWash

  • SimpleWash: http://simplewa.sh/about
    The SimpleWash app scans the content on your Facebook and Twitter profiles and detects keywords associated with things you might not want a potential employer to see.

Twitter

  • Twitterhttps://twitter.com/
    The more you use Twitter, the higher it will rank in the search results for your name. Think about what you want searchers to see when they look for you.

UA.edu

  • IT Service Desk Web Publishing
    http://oit.ua.edu/oit/services/it-service-desk/it-service-desk-web-publishing/
    myBama account holders have access to web hosting on the bama.ua.edu server.
  • people.ua.edu
    http://www.people.ua.edu/
    The Office of Multimedia Services offers a simple tool UA faculty can use to create sites for professional use.

Building Digital Editions

For those of you who are interested but could not attend yesterday, Nathan Humpal and Franky Abbott gave a “Building Digital Editions” workshop about basic vocabulary, project planning, and possibilities for creating digital scholarly editions. Resources from their presentation include video and their presentation outline with resources and examples. If you are interested in thinking through or getting started with a digital editions project, don’t hesitate to contact the ADHC to set up a consultation. Thanks Nathan and Franky!

Using Relational Databases

Understanding how databases function and why they are important is key to doing much of the project work we do in the ADHC. Steven Turner of Web Services gave an intro workshop this week: “Using Relational Databases for Digital Research.” He covered some basics about what relational databases are, how they work, and why they are important for organizing data and building web-based projects. Here are resources from the workshop: video, slides, and handout of useful resources. Thanks, Steve!

Intellectual Property Resources

Claire Lewis Evans, Editor for Digital and Electronic Publishing at The University of Alabama Press, gave a great workshop on intellectual property last week. She has made available many resources from her presentation: video (in Tegrity), slides, and two documents: Campus Copyright Rights and Responsibilities: A Basic Guide to Policy Considerations and The Association of American University Presses Permission FAQs. Thanks so much to Claire for giving us a great overview of the issues at stake within universities.

Social Media in the Classroom Workshop

Thanks so much to Rebecca Johnson, Director of Instructional Technologies and New Pedagogies at eTech for her workshop, “Using Social Media in the Classroom” last week. She gave a great presentation and started an interesting discussion with participants about the pros and cons of various approaches to social media for pedagogy. We appreciate her contribution to the workshop effort. Her presentation slides and resources can be found here.

Introduction to WordPress: Building a Class Online

Today’s workshop, led by David Ainsworth, focused on building and using a WordPress site in a pedagogical context. This teaching focus was an important part of the workshop since, as Dr. Ainsworth pointed out, WordPress sites can be used to build almost any kind of website (more and less effectively). He also made a strong case for the advantages of the public orientation of WordPress sites (as opposed to those on Blackboard) and the opportunities they create for student engagement with new audiences. He has made his slides and handout available for those who couldn’t make it or want to know more.  There are lots of resources for working with WordPress – if you are in Arts & Sciences then e-Tech can help (with course sites and research sites) and of course the ADHC can always help you get started. Thanks for your contribution to our workshops, Dr. Ainsworth!

Resources from “Introducing Omeka for Digital Projects”

Dr. Steven MacCall gave a wonderful workshop last week to a big crowd about Omeka (an open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions from George Mason’s Center for History and New Media).  We’re excited to continue offering Omeka instruction and assistance, perhaps as a series of sessions with a small group working on their own projects.  Thanks Dr. MacCall for participating in our workshop series and for sharing your presentation slides and your handout!